Update README to match Evergreen's format
authorDan Scott <dscott@laurentian.ca>
Wed, 4 Jan 2012 20:17:48 +0000 (15:17 -0500)
committerDan Scott <dscott@laurentian.ca>
Wed, 29 Feb 2012 15:26:10 +0000 (10:26 -0500)
Reference the various accounts in use consistently.

Correct reference to "fedora" target in Makefile.install.

Put the developer preamble up front.

Provide more Fedora examples.

Do not include leading "#" and "$" in bash examples, to make it easier
for people to copy and paste.

Include source highlighting instructions and titles for example
commands.

Signed-off-by: Dan Scott <dscott@laurentian.ca>
README

diff --git a/README b/README
index 8fd78cc..cb3770b 100644 (file)
--- a/README
+++ b/README
@@ -1,8 +1,27 @@
-README for OpenSRF 2.0.0
-============================
-
-Installing prerequisites:
--------------------------
+README for OpenSRF 2.0.2
+========================
+
+Preamble: referenced user accounts
+----------------------------------
+
+In subsequent sections, we will refer to a number of different accounts, as
+follows:
+
+  * Linux user accounts:
+    ** The *user* Linux account is the account that you use to log onto the
+       Linux system as a regular user.
+    ** The *root* Linux account is an account that has system administrator
+       privileges. On Debian and Fedora you can switch to this account from
+       your *user* account by issuing the `su -` command and entering the
+       password for the *root* account when prompted. On Ubuntu you can switch
+       to this account from your *user* account using the `sudo su -` command
+       and entering the password for your *user* account when prompted.
+    ** The *opensrf* Linux account is an account that you will create as part
+       of installing OpenSRF. You can switch to this account from the *root*
+       account by issuing the `su - opensrf` command.
+
+Installing prerequisites
+------------------------
 
 OpenSRF has a number of prerequisite packages that must be installed
 before you can successfully configure, compile, and install OpenSRF.
 
 OpenSRF has a number of prerequisite packages that must be installed
 before you can successfully configure, compile, and install OpenSRF.
@@ -25,7 +44,7 @@ Well-tested values for <osname> include:
   * `ubuntu-hardy` for Ubuntu 8.04
   * `ubuntu-lucid` for Ubuntu 10.04
   * `ubuntu-precise` for Ubuntu 12.04
   * `ubuntu-hardy` for Ubuntu 8.04
   * `ubuntu-lucid` for Ubuntu 10.04
   * `ubuntu-precise` for Ubuntu 12.04
-  * `fedora15` for Fedora 15
+  * `fedora` for Fedora 16
 
 Less-tested values for <osname> include:
 
 
 Less-tested values for <osname> include:
 
@@ -40,22 +59,40 @@ be prompted for configuration of Comprehensive Perl Archive Network (CPAN)
 on your server. You can generally accept the defaults by pressing <return>
 for all of the prompts, except for the country configuration.
 
 on your server. You can generally accept the defaults by pressing <return>
 for all of the prompts, except for the country configuration.
 
+Preamble: Developer instructions
+--------------------------------
+
 [NOTE]
 [NOTE]
-If you are installing this using a copy of the source code that was
-checked out directly from the OpenSRF git repository rather
-than from a downloaded release of the source code, there are a few
-additional prerequisite tools and steps that you will need to follow.
-See "Developer instructions" at the bottom of the file.
+Skip this section if you are using an official release tarball downloaded
+from http://evergreen-ils.org/downloads
 
 
-Configuration and compilation instructions:
--------------------------------------------
+Developers working directly with the source code from the Git repository,
+rather than an official release tarball, must install some extra packages
+and perform one step before they can proceed with the `./configure` step.
+
+As the *root* Linux account, install the following packages:
+
+  * autoconf
+  * automake
+  * libtool
+
+As the *user* Linux account, issue the following command in the OpenSRF
+source directory to generate the configure script and Makefiles:
+
+[source, bash]
+------------------------------------------------------------------------------
+./autogen.sh
+------------------------------------------------------------------------------
+
+Configuration and compilation instructions
+------------------------------------------
 
 Use the `configure` command to configure OpenSRF, and the `make` command to
 build OpenSRF. The default installation prefix (PREFIX) for OpenSRF is
 `/opensrf/`.
 
 
 Use the `configure` command to configure OpenSRF, and the `make` command to
 build OpenSRF. The default installation prefix (PREFIX) for OpenSRF is
 `/opensrf/`.
 
-If you are building OpenSRF for Evergreen, pass the `--prefix` and
-`--sysconfdir` options as follows:
+If you are building OpenSRF for Evergreen, issue the following commands as
+the *user* Linux account to configure and build OpenSRF:
 
 ---------------------------------------------------------------------------
 ./configure --prefix=/openils --sysconfdir=/openils/conf
 
 ---------------------------------------------------------------------------
 ./configure --prefix=/openils --sysconfdir=/openils/conf
@@ -64,40 +101,39 @@ make
 
 By default, OpenSRF includes C, Perl, and JavaScript support.
 You can add the `--enable-python` option to the configure command
 
 By default, OpenSRF includes C, Perl, and JavaScript support.
 You can add the `--enable-python` option to the configure command
-to build Python support, and `--enable-java` for Java support.
-
-Installation instructions:
---------------------------
+to build Python support and `--enable-java` for Java support.
 
 
-Once you have configured and compiled OpenSRF, issue the following
-command as the root user to install OpenSRF:
+Installation instructions
+-------------------------
 
 
+1. Once you have configured and compiled OpenSRF, issue the following
+   command as the *root* Linux account to install OpenSRF:
++
+[source, bash]
 ---------------------------------------------------------------------------
 make install
 ---------------------------------------------------------------------------
 
 ---------------------------------------------------------------------------
 make install
 ---------------------------------------------------------------------------
 
-This will install OpenSRF in the prefix directory that you specified in the
-configuration step. This will also install example configuration files that
-you can use as templates for your own configuration files.
-
-Create and set up the opensrf Unix user environment:
-----------------------------------------------------
+Create and set up the opensrf Unix user environment
+---------------------------------------------------
 
 This user is used to start and stop all OpenSRF processes, and must own all
 files contained in the PREFIX directory hierarchy. Issue the following
 
 This user is used to start and stop all OpenSRF processes, and must own all
 files contained in the PREFIX directory hierarchy. Issue the following
-commands as root to create the `opensrf` user and set up its environment,
-substituting <PREFIX> with the value you passed to `--prefix` in your
-configure command:
+commands as the *root* Linux account to create the `opensrf` user and set up
+its environment, substituting <PREFIX> with the value you passed to `--prefix`
+in your configure command:
 
 
+.Creating the `opensrf` user
+[source, bash]
 ---------------------------------------------------------------------------
 ---------------------------------------------------------------------------
-useradd -m -s /bin/bash opensrf
-echo "export PATH=\$PATH:/<PREFIX>/bin" >> /home/opensrf/.bashrc
-passwd opensrf
-chown -R opensrf:opensrf /<PREFIX>
+useradd -m -s /bin/bash opensrf
+echo "export PATH=\$PATH:/<PREFIX>/bin" >> /home/opensrf/.bashrc
+passwd opensrf
+chown -R opensrf:opensrf /<PREFIX>
 ---------------------------------------------------------------------------
 
 ---------------------------------------------------------------------------
 
-Define your public and private OpenSRF domains:
------------------------------------------------
+Define your public and private OpenSRF domains
+----------------------------------------------
 
 For security purposes, OpenSRF uses Jabber domains to separate services
 into public and private realms. Throughout these instructions, we will use
 
 For security purposes, OpenSRF uses Jabber domains to separate services
 into public and private realms. Throughout these instructions, we will use
@@ -105,33 +141,37 @@ the example domains `public.localhost` and `private.localhost`.
 
 On a single-server system, the easiest way to define public and private
 domains is to define separate hostnames by adding entries to the `/etc/hosts`
 
 On a single-server system, the easiest way to define public and private
 domains is to define separate hostnames by adding entries to the `/etc/hosts`
-file. Here are entries that you could make to a stock `/etc/hosts` file for our
+file. Here are entries that you could add to a stock `/etc/hosts` file for our
 example domains:
 
 example domains:
 
+.Example added entries for `/etc/hosts`
 ---------------------------------------------------------------------------
 127.0.1.2      public.localhost        public
 127.0.1.3      private.localhost       private
 ---------------------------------------------------------------------------
 
 ---------------------------------------------------------------------------
 127.0.1.2      public.localhost        public
 127.0.1.3      private.localhost       private
 ---------------------------------------------------------------------------
 
-Adjust the system dynamic library path:
----------------------------------------
+Adjust the system dynamic library path
+--------------------------------------
 
 Add `<PREFIX>/lib/` to the system's dynamic library path, and then run
 
 Add `<PREFIX>/lib/` to the system's dynamic library path, and then run
-`ldconfig` as root.
+`ldconfig` as the *root* Linux account.
 
 
-On Debian and Ubuntu systems, run the following commands as root:
+On Debian, Ubuntu, and Fedora systems, run the following commands as the *root*
+Linux account:
 
 
+.Adjusting the system dynamic library path
+[source, bash]
 ---------------------------------------------------------------------------
 ---------------------------------------------------------------------------
-echo <PREFIX>/lib > /etc/ld.so.conf.d/opensrf.conf
-ldconfig
+echo <PREFIX>/lib > /etc/ld.so.conf.d/opensrf.conf
+ldconfig
 ---------------------------------------------------------------------------
 
 On most other systems, you can add these entries to `/etc/ld.so.conf`, or
 create a file within the `/etc/ld.so.conf.d/` directory, and then run
 ---------------------------------------------------------------------------
 
 On most other systems, you can add these entries to `/etc/ld.so.conf`, or
 create a file within the `/etc/ld.so.conf.d/` directory, and then run
-`ldconfig` as root.
+`ldconfig` as the *root* Linux account.
 
 
-Configure the ejabberd server:
-------------------------------
+Configure the ejabberd server
+-----------------------------
 
 OpenSRF requires an XMPP (Jabber) server. For performance reasons, ejabberd is
 the Jabber server of choice for the OpenSRF project. In most cases, you only
 
 OpenSRF requires an XMPP (Jabber) server. For performance reasons, ejabberd is
 the Jabber server of choice for the OpenSRF project. In most cases, you only
@@ -139,10 +179,18 @@ have to make a few changes to the default `ejabberd.cfg` file to make ejabberd
 work for OpenSRF. 
 
 1. Stop ejabberd before making any changes to its configuration by issuing the
 work for OpenSRF. 
 
 1. Stop ejabberd before making any changes to its configuration by issuing the
-following command as root:
+   following command as the *root* Linux account:
++
+.(Debian / Ubuntu) Stopping ejabberd
+[source, bash]
+---------------------------------------------------------------------------
+/etc/init.d/ejabberd stop
+---------------------------------------------------------------------------
 +
 +
+.(Fedora) Stopping ejabberd
+[source, bash]
 ---------------------------------------------------------------------------
 ---------------------------------------------------------------------------
-# /etc/init.d/ejabberd stop
+systemctl stop ejabberd.service
 ---------------------------------------------------------------------------
 +
 2. Open `/etc/ejabberd/ejabberd.cfg` and make the following
 ---------------------------------------------------------------------------
 +
 2. Open `/etc/ejabberd/ejabberd.cfg` and make the following
@@ -160,12 +208,21 @@ changes:
   e. Change all `maxrate` values to 500000 
 +
 3. Restart the ejabberd server to make the changes take effect:
   e. Change all `maxrate` values to 500000 
 +
 3. Restart the ejabberd server to make the changes take effect:
++
+.(Debian / Ubuntu) Starting ejabberd
+[source, bash]
+---------------------------------------------------------------------------
+/etc/init.d/ejabberd start
 ---------------------------------------------------------------------------
 ---------------------------------------------------------------------------
-# /etc/init.d/ejabberd start
++
+.(Fedora) Starting ejabberd
+[source, bash]
+---------------------------------------------------------------------------
+systemctl start ejabberd.service
 ---------------------------------------------------------------------------
 
 ---------------------------------------------------------------------------
 
-Create the OpenSRF Jabber users:
---------------------------------
+Create the OpenSRF Jabber users
+-------------------------------
 
 On each domain, you need two Jabber users to manage the OpenSRF communications:
 
 
 On each domain, you need two Jabber users to manage the OpenSRF communications:
 
@@ -174,22 +231,25 @@ On each domain, you need two Jabber users to manage the OpenSRF communications:
   * an `opensrf` user, which clients use to connect to OpenSRF services; this
     user can be named anything you like
 
   * an `opensrf` user, which clients use to connect to OpenSRF services; this
     user can be named anything you like
 
-Create the Jabber users by issuing the following commands as root. Substitute
-<password> for your chosen passwords for each user respectively:
+Create the Jabber users by issuing the following commands as the *root* Linux
+account. Substitute `<password>` for your chosen passwords for each user
+respectively:
 
 
+.Creating the OpenSRF Jabber users
+[source, bash]
 ---------------------------------------------------------------------------
 ---------------------------------------------------------------------------
-ejabberdctl register router private.localhost <password>
-ejabberdctl register opensrf private.localhost <password>
-ejabberdctl register router public.localhost <password>
-ejabberdctl register opensrf public.localhost <password>
+ejabberdctl register router private.localhost <password>
+ejabberdctl register opensrf private.localhost <password>
+ejabberdctl register router public.localhost <password>
+ejabberdctl register opensrf public.localhost <password>
 ---------------------------------------------------------------------------
 
 ---------------------------------------------------------------------------
 
-Update the OpenSRF configuration files:
----------------------------------------
+Update the OpenSRF configuration files
+--------------------------------------
 
 There are two critical files that you must update to make OpenSRF work.
 SYSCONFDIR is `/opensrf/etc` by default, or the value that you passed to
 
 There are two critical files that you must update to make OpenSRF work.
 SYSCONFDIR is `/opensrf/etc` by default, or the value that you passed to
-`--sysconfdir` during the configuration phase:
+`--sysconfdir` during the configuration phase.
 
   * `SYSCONFDIR/opensrf.xml` - this file lists the services that this
     OpenSRF installation supports; if you create a new OpenSRF service,
 
   * `SYSCONFDIR/opensrf.xml` - this file lists the services that this
     OpenSRF installation supports; if you create a new OpenSRF service,
@@ -213,80 +273,74 @@ You should also create a `.srfsh.xml` file in the home directory of each user
 that you want to enable to use the srfsh to communicate with OpenSRF services.
 
 Copy `SYSCONFDIR/srfsh.xml.example` to `~/.srfsh.xml` and update the password 
 that you want to enable to use the srfsh to communicate with OpenSRF services.
 
 Copy `SYSCONFDIR/srfsh.xml.example` to `~/.srfsh.xml` and update the password 
-to match the one for your Jabber `opensrf` user with the private.localhost 
+to match the one for your Jabber `opensrf` user with the `private.localhost`
 domain.
 
 domain.
 
-Starting and stopping OpenSRF services:
----------------------------------------
+Starting and stopping OpenSRF services
+--------------------------------------
 
 To start all OpenSRF services with a hostname of `localhost`, issue the
 
 To start all OpenSRF services with a hostname of `localhost`, issue the
-following command as the opensrf user:
+following command as the *opensrf* Linux account:
 
 
+[source, bash]
 ---------------------------------------------------------------------------
 ---------------------------------------------------------------------------
-osrf_ctl.sh -l -a start_all
+osrf_ctl.sh -l -a start_all
 ---------------------------------------------------------------------------
 
 To stop all OpenSRF services with a hostname of `localhost`, issue the
 ---------------------------------------------------------------------------
 
 To stop all OpenSRF services with a hostname of `localhost`, issue the
-following command as the opensrf user:
+following command as the *opensrf* Linux account:
 
 [source,bash]
 ---------------------------------------------------------------------------
 
 [source,bash]
 ---------------------------------------------------------------------------
-osrf_ctl.sh -l -a stop_all
+osrf_ctl.sh -l -a stop_all
 ---------------------------------------------------------------------------
 
 ---------------------------------------------------------------------------
 
-Testing the default OpenSRF services:
--------------------------------------
+Testing the default OpenSRF services
+------------------------------------
 
 By default, OpenSRF ships with an `opensrf.math` service that performs basic
 calculations involving two integers. Once you have started the OpenSRF
 
 By default, OpenSRF ships with an `opensrf.math` service that performs basic
 calculations involving two integers. Once you have started the OpenSRF
-services, start srfsh and issue the following request:
+services, test the services as follows:
 
 
+1. Start the `srfsh` interactive OpenSRF shell by issuing the following
+   command as the *opensrf* Linux account:
++
+.Starting the `srfsh` interactive OpenSRF shell
+[source,bash]
+---------------------------------------------------------------------------
+srfsh
+---------------------------------------------------------------------------
++
+2. Issue the following request to test the `opensrf.math` service:
++
 ---------------------------------------------------------------------------
 srfsh# request opensrf.math add 2,2
 ---------------------------------------------------------------------------
 ---------------------------------------------------------------------------
 srfsh# request opensrf.math add 2,2
 ---------------------------------------------------------------------------
-
++
 You should receive the value `4`.
 
 You should receive the value `4`.
 
-Troubleshooting note for Python users:
---------------------------------------
+Troubleshooting note for Python users
+-------------------------------------
 
 If you are running a Python client and trying to connect to OpenSRF running on
 localhost rather than a hostname that can be resolved via DNS, you will
 probably receive exceptions about `dns.resolver.NXDOMAIN`. If this happens,
 you need to install the `dnsmasq` package, configure it to serve up a DNS
 entry for localhost, and point your local DNS resolver to `dnsmasq`. For example,
 
 If you are running a Python client and trying to connect to OpenSRF running on
 localhost rather than a hostname that can be resolved via DNS, you will
 probably receive exceptions about `dns.resolver.NXDOMAIN`. If this happens,
 you need to install the `dnsmasq` package, configure it to serve up a DNS
 entry for localhost, and point your local DNS resolver to `dnsmasq`. For example,
-on Ubuntu you can issue the following commands as root:
+on Ubuntu you can issue the following commands as the *root* Linux account:
 
 
+.(Debian / Ubuntu) Installing and starting `dnsmasq`
+[source, bash]
 ---------------------------------------------------------------------------
 ---------------------------------------------------------------------------
-aptitude install dnsmasq
-/etc/init.d/dnsmasq restart
+aptitude install dnsmasq
+/etc/init.d/dnsmasq restart
 ---------------------------------------------------------------------------
 
 Then edit `/etc/resolv.conf` and ensure that `nameserver 127.0.0.1` is the
 first entry in the file.
 
 ---------------------------------------------------------------------------
 
 Then edit `/etc/resolv.conf` and ensure that `nameserver 127.0.0.1` is the
 first entry in the file.
 
-Developer instructions:
------------------------
-
-Developers working directly with the source code from the git
-repository will also need to install some extra packages and perform
-one more step before they can proceed with the `./configure` step.
-
-Install the following packages:
-
-  * autoconf
-  * automake
-  * libtool
-
-Run the following command in the source directory to generate the configure
-script and Makefiles:
-
----------------------------------------------------------------------------
-$ ./autogen.sh 
----------------------------------------------------------------------------
-
-Getting help:
--------------
+Getting help
+------------
 
 Need help installing or using OpenSRF? Join the mailing lists at
 http://evergreen-ils.org/listserv.php or contact us on the Freenode
 
 Need help installing or using OpenSRF? Join the mailing lists at
 http://evergreen-ils.org/listserv.php or contact us on the Freenode